Some Basics

About Us

Who? Bowls Manitoba Inc is a corporation that operates several Clubs in the province (mostly in Winnipeg) and sets local standards for Lawn Bowls.
What? Lawn Bowls or lawn bowling is both a sport and a game.
Why? Because players can’t get enough exercise without it.
Where? There are Clubs in Winnipeg, Brandon, and Gimli.
When? October to April (indoors) and May to September (outdoors).
How? Members play on grass (or artificial grass) and on carpet.

Attitude

Friendly Since we’re in Manitoba, it goes without saying that we’re anxious to please.
Helpful Clubs have experienced players who love to share what they know.
Available Morning, noon, and nighttimes too – at the mercy of the weather, however.
Sociable Kitchen is run by members – tea and coffee often available.
Reasonable Annual membership varies by club – beginners pay less.
Requirements Dress for comfort but respect the grass with heel-less footwear.
Equipment Bowls can be purchased, rented, or borrowed – all else is provided.
Commitment None: social games start on time daily and last perhaps two hours.
Terminology Learned as you play – or learn it from this website.
Aggression Leave it at home – or sit this one out.

Types of Game

Mixed A game with both men and women within it
Singles One player against another – Four bowls each
Pairs Two players against two – also called Doubles – Four bowls each
Triples Three players against three – Three bowls each
Fours Four players against four – Two bowls each

Club Games (uneven draws)

Pair vs Triple A five player made-up game – the Pair bowl 4 bowls each

and the Triple bowl just 8 bowls (either 2, 2, 4 or 3, 3, 2)

Four vs Triple A seven player made-up game – there are two choices:

the Four bowl 3, 2, 2, 2 and the Triple bowl 3, 3, 3

or the Four bowl 2, 2, 2, 2 and the Triple bowl 2, 3, 3

Terminology

aiming line an imaginary line the player aims along to allow for the bias of the bowl
aiming point a point on the aiming line where a bowler focuses during bowl delivery
bank the area above the ditch – around the outside of the green
bias the weighted side of a bowling bowl, which causes it to curve towards
boundary the outer border line of the lane or rink on which one bowls
centre line an (often unmarked) line down the centre of the lane or rink
delivery the action of rolling the bowl or jack
ditch the gutter around the outside edge of the green (often sand-filled)
draw shot to deliver a bowl as close as possible to the jack
head the group of bowls, including the jack, at rest within the boundary
heavy either a slow green – or an unintentional delivery that stops past the jack
jack the 3” diameter ball (usually white) used as the target (same as kitty)
jack high a delivered bowl that has stopped at the same distance as the jack
kitty another name for the jack
lane the numbered rink within the boundary lines – usually one of 8 rinks
mat the area from which a player delivers a bowl
narrow describes a bowl that followed an incorrect aiming line, crossing in front of the jack
plinth the edge of the grass which meets the ditch
point a unit of score – one point scored for each nearest bowl to the jack
rink the numbered lane within the boundary lines – about 1/8th of the green
shot currently the closest bowl to the jack – ‘shot bowl’

any delivered bowl, describing it’s delivery – ‘your previous shot’

the score, measured in closest bowls to the jack – ‘you count three shots’

toucher a bowl that remains in play after touching the jack – (it is chalked once it has come to rest, even if it lands in the ditch)
weight the degree of force applied to the bowl during delivery – (good weight)
wide describes a bowl that followed an incorrect aiming line, missing the target

(the delivery was too wide for the bias to bring the bowl to the jack)